On Tuesday, May 28, starting at 6 a.m. Eastern time, a database upgrade may make forms temporarily unavailable on the ARM and ASR websites. These include accounts, research highlights and publications, field campaigns, facility/help requests, and ARM data orders.

Jennifer Delamere—Chair

Portrait of Jennifer Delamere

Role

  • Research Associate Professor, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Education

  • PhD, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 2003
  • BA, Physics, Johns Hopkins University, 1993

Research Interests

A central theme of my research has always been the Arctic and use of data from ARM’s North Slope of Alaska (NSA) facility. As an early career researcher, I focused on atmospheric radiation model development and intercomparisons with ground-based measurements from ARM facilities. Two decades later, I continue to develop rapid radiative transfer models (RRTMs). A 2010 publication, “A far‐infrared radiative closure study in the Arctic: Application to water vapor,” summarizes the concept of model-measurement intercomparisons that is foundational to my research. Recently I have researched snow-cover characteristics and albedo, as well as precipitation measurement techniques, at NSA.

Professional Experience

In 1993, as a new atmospheric science student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), I became a member of the founding NSA Site Scientist Team. I was also introduced to the radiative transfer modeling that led to my first job as a developer of RRTMs. The inclusion of RRTMG in numerous climate and weather prediction models was a significant milestone for ARM. At UAF, I manage the Geographic Information Network of Alaska, a satellite direct-broadcast facility responsible for delivering remotely sensed products in near-real time to forecasting agencies. While arctic fieldwork and remote-sensing responsibilities might seem disparate, my research and operational efforts share the same goal: improved understanding of arctic processes.

Michael Jensen—Vice-Chair

ROLE

  • Meteorologist, Brookhaven National Laboratory

EDUCATION

  • PhD, Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, 2000
  • MS, Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State University, 1993
  • BS, Atmospheric Sciences, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1990

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My research combines observational and modeling studies to better understand the life cycle of cloud systems and the role they play in Earth’s energy balance. I have been actively involved with ARM and ASR since 1996, working on the life cycle of convective clouds, the characteristics of marine boundary-layer clouds, and the retrieval of cloud microphysical properties from remote-sensing observations.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

I have held several roles in the ARM/ASR community. I was the ARM translator for the Cloud Properties/Processes working groups from 2005 to 2016, and lead ARM translator from 2009 to 2016. In 2011 I was PI for the MC3E campaign at the Southern Great Plains observatory. Since 2016, I have managed the joint BNL-ANL ASR Science Focus Area project titled PASCCALS. Most recently, I have been the PI for the TRACER campaign in Houston from October 2021 to September 2022.

Osinachi Ajoku

ROLE

  • Assistant Professor, Howard University

EDUCATION

  • PhD, Oceanography, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 2020
  • MS, Geosciences, University of California, Riverside, 2014
  • BS, Geology, California State University, Dominguez Hills, 2011

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My research revolves around better understanding aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions over Africa and the Atlantic Ocean. I use satellite observations as well as regional and global climate models to address research areas of interest. Additionally, I am interested in creating kilometer-scale model grids over Africa using CESM and E3SM to better simulate and forecast biomass-burning outflow events.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

As a professor, my duties include teaching, advising students, and writing publications and proposals. I am currently a principal investigator for a DOE grant through ASR. Outside research, I am involved with Global Ocean Corps, an affiliate of the United Nations Decade of Science.

Sarah Brooks

ROLE

  • Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University

EDUCATION

  • PhD, Analytical Chemistry, University of Colorado Boulder, 2002
  • SB, Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1995

RESEARCH INTERESTS

Throughout my career, I have investigated the chemical, physical, and optical properties of aerosols through measurements from aircraft, ship, and ground-based platforms. I have designed and built instruments to measure in situ ice crystal initiation and growth. My work has demonstrated that a wide variety of aerosols can initiate ice cloud formation and consequently that multiple ice nucleation pathways must be parameterized in climate models.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

My field campaign experience includes participation in DOE-ISDAC in 2008, FIN-02 and FIN-03 International Ice Nucleation Workshops in 2014 and 2015, and most recently TRACER in 2022, as PI and occasional van driver of the Texas A&M ROAM-V (Rapid On-Site Atmospheric Measurements Van). I have a solid record of publications.

Susannah Burrows

Role

  • Scientist IV, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Education

  • PhD, Atmospheric Science, Max Planck Graduate Center with Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany, 2011
  • Diplom (MS equivalent), Atmospheric Physics (Meteorology), Johannes Gutenberg University, 2008
  • BS, Physics and German Studies, Oberlin College, 2005

Research Interests

My research interests involve interactions between atmospheric composition and climate, particularly those involving the biosphere. I integrate observations into models to improve their realism, and to use observations in benchmarking model skill. I developed emissions parameterizations for bacteria-bearing aerosol particles and sea spray organic matter and have studied their impacts as cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei. Through these efforts, I have engaged with biogeochemistry models, and recently led the first stages of an effort to build a fully coupled carbon cycle modeling capability within DOE’s E3SM.

Professional Experience

I currently hold two roles: (1) as deputy group lead for the E3SM Biogeochemical Cycles Group and (2) as PI of a DOE Early Career project on ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The latter project focuses on analysis and modeling of ARM observations at marine locations. In addition, as part of this project, I will oversee a small field campaign studying the composition and sources of INPs at the ARM Southern Great Plains site.

Scott Collis

Role

  • Atmospheric Scientist and Department Head, Argonne National Laboratory
  • Senior Fellow, Northwestern Argonne Institute for Science and Engineering

Education

  • PhD, Physical Sciences, Australian National University, 2007
  • Grad. Dip. Meteorology, Australian Bureau of Meteorology Teaching Centre, 2007
  • BS, Honors, University of Sydney, 1999

Research Interests

My research interests lie at the intersection between precipitating cloud systems, remote and in situ sensing, and open-source community software development. I am fascinated by the scale and magnitudes of structures in storms and using these to build observational targets to interrogate the fidelity of models. I believe the key to great science is the creation of community tools (e.g., Py-ART; Helmus and Collis 2016), as these are open-source repositories of our collective knowledge that allow scientists to truly “stand on the shoulders of giants.”

Professional Experience

I came to my current position through a non-straightforward route that gives me broad knowledge. For my PhD, I developed a novel supersonic gas injection device that can optimize electron density profiles in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. I then took up a postdoc at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, using C- and S-band radar to study deep convection. In 2010 I came to ANL to develop retrievals for ARM’s C- and X-band radars. In 2019 I was appointed head of the new Geospatial Computing, Innovations and Sensing Department. I am a co-investigator on the TRACER and SAIL campaigns.

Jessie Creamean

Role

  • Research Scientist III, Colorado State University

Education

  • PhD, Chemistry, University of California, San Diego, 2009
  • MS, Chemistry, University of California, San Diego, 2009
  • BS, Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 2007

Research Interests

My foremost area of research is aerosol-cloud interactions, specifically processes associated with ice nucleation. Currently, my work has been very interdisciplinary, focusing on arctic aerosol physical and microphysical properties in the context of meteorology, oceanography, and ecology to assess the sources, abundance, and efficacy of ice-nucleating particles (INPs). I have also studied aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions at high elevations, publishing this work in Science and Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP). My recent aerosol and ice nucleation work in the Alaskan Arctic—including at the third ARM Mobile Facility (AMF3) in Oliktok Point—is published in ACP and Geophysical Research Letters.

Professional Experience

My current responsibilities at CSU include field and lab work, publications, and writing grant proposals. I am a steering committee member for the NOAA Arctic Research Program’s PI meeting and Atmospheric Ice Nucleation Conference, chair of AGU and AMS conference sessions, and a proposal panel reviewer for ASR and NSF. For the last five years, I have been on the ASR North Slope Site Science Team. As an ARM INP co-mentor, I will collect filters at AMF3 and the Southern Great Plains observatory over the next year to provide a time series of INP data, as well as produce INP data for SAIL and TRACER. My fieldwork involves 15 deployments since 2008. I am currently a lead PI of MOSAiC, a permafrost project in Alaska, and three expeditions in the Bering and Chukchi Seas. I am enthusiastic about communicating my research to the scientific community and general public.

Connor J. Flynn

ROLE

  • Senior Research Associate, University of Oklahoma

EDUCATION

  • PhD, Physics, University of Idaho, 1995
  • BS, Science, Eastern Washington University, 1989

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My research interests lie with instrumentation and retrievals, and applicable modeling (Mie core-shell, SBDART, MODTRAN, LBLRTM). Although for the last decade I have been heavily involved in aerosol measurements and retrievals, I have recently renewed an interest in cloud measurements, both remote sensing and in situ.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

I started work at ARM as a postdoc at PNNL in 1995. I’ve been a mentor for more than 15 ARM instruments (several I’ve designed and built), including FTIR, lidar, shortwave spectrometers, and airborne instruments. I have been in field campaigns with ARM and NASA in every climate regime (arctic, temperate, tropical, desert, rainforest, coastal, inland) with ground-based, marine, airborne (both crewed and uncrewed) instrumentation, and satellite products.

Erika Roesler

ROLE

  • Scientist, Sandia National Laboratories

EDUCATION

  • PhD, Atmospheric Sciences, University of Michigan, 2012
  • MS, Physics and Astronomy, Eastern Michigan University, 2006
  • BS, Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, 2004
  • BS, Physics, Northern Arizona University, 2004

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My research foci tend to lie in intersectional corners. An example is finding lightweight sensors to collect data from uncrewed aerial platforms, then using that data to inform numerical models. Broadly, my research interests have also been motivated by understanding implications and consequences of climate change intervention, mitigation, and adaptation techniques. Additional examples of research interests are in aerosol-cloud interactions. I have published reports and peer-reviewed articles in the EGU, AGU, and OSTI databases.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

I started research in the model-experiment (ModEx) space through collaborations with ARM-based field campaigns such as ISDAC and M-PACE. The experience was broadened with leading a project measuring cloud microphysical processes on the tethered balloon system and using the global E3SM. Recently, my research has expanded to the stratosphere through high-altitude balloon atmospheric measurements.

Yunpeng Shan

ROLE

  • Postdoctoral Research Associate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

EDUCATION

  • PhD, Atmospheric Science, University of Nevada, 2018
  • MS, Atmospheric Physics and Environment, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing, China, 2014
  • BS, Atmospheric Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing, China, 2011

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My interests include atmospheric model development; interpretation of cloud microphysics and its parameterization; aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions; weather and air-quality forecast; and renewable energy. I have published 28 peer-reviewed papers, one of which was recognized as a top-cited paper in Earth’s Future. My work improving convective ice microphysics parameterization in the NCAR CAM model was highlighted by ARM’s 2021 Annual Report.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

I started my academic career developing aerosol and cloud microphysics schemes for mesoscale and global models. I used ARM data to test my schemes and evaluate model performance. With colleagues, I have been developing an aerosol wet removal parameterization for deep convection that has been adopted by the latest NCAR CESM v2 model and will also be implemented in the DOE E3SM model. I am now using cloud and aerosol measurements at ARM’s Eastern North Atlantic observatory to develop a triple-moment cloud microphysics scheme and examine aerosol-cloud interaction. I am also a guest editor for Atmosphere.

Zhien Wang

ROLE

  • Professor, The School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University

EDUCATION

  • PhD, Meteorology, University of Utah, 2000
  • MS, Optics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1994
  • BS, Physics, Anhui Normal University, China, 1990

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My research focuses on airborne instrument development, multi-sensor retrievals of aerosol, cloud, and precipitation properties, and cloud microphysical process studies. Starting with ARM multi-sensor mixed-phase cloud retrievals, I developed A-Train satellite-based mixed-phase cloud retrievals to provide mixed-phase cloud properties globally. With lidar and radar, my group characterizes dust distributions and quantifies the impacts of dust on ice generation in stratiform mixed-phase clouds.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

I developed algorithms for cloud detection, classification, and microphysical property retrievals with ARM multi-sensor measurements. As a professor and the NSF Wyoming King Air national facility chief scientist at the University of Wyoming, I led the single-aircraft integration of multiple remote sensors and in situ sampling for aerosol, cloud, and precipitation observations. With measurements from A-Train satellites, I have developed three CloudSat standard products. Recently, I developed airborne Raman lidar and Doppler lidar to profile thermodynamic and dynamic conditions around clouds. I have participated in 13 field projects for aerosol, cloud, and PBL studies.

Maria Zawadowicz

ROLE

  • Assistant Environmental Scientist, Brookhaven National Laboratory

EDUCATION

  • PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2017
  • BA, Lake Forest College, 2012

RESEARCH INTERESTS

My research interests encompass many aspects of aerosol and trace gas composition measurements in the field and laboratory. I use state-of-the-art mass spectrometry techniques, often coupled to machine learning algorithms, to characterize aerosol and trace gas chemistry and apply the resulting knowledge to problems in climate, biosphere-atmosphere interactions, and atmospheric chemistry.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

I received my PhD in 2017 from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, working in Dan Cziczo’s lab on single-particle mass spectrometry, focusing on bioaerosol detection by mass spectrometry. As a postdoctoral researcher, I worked at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in John Shilling’s lab on experiments of secondary organic aerosol formation and transformations, as well as on ARM’s ACE-ENA campaign. In 2020 I joined Brookhaven National Laboratory as an assistant environmental scientist, also taking on the role of an ARM mentor for aerosol composition measurements. As an ARM instrument mentor, I am responsible for deployment of ARM instrumentation, its data quality assessment, and communication with the user community.

Yunyan Zhang

Role

  • Staff Scientist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Education

  • PhD, Atmospheric Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, 2006
  • BS, Atmospheric Sciences, Peking University, China, 1998

Research Interests

Always having been fascinated by the life cycle of clouds, I am interested in the diurnal cycle, low-level stratiform clouds, shallow cumulus, shallow-to-deep convection transition, cloud-climate feedback, and interactions between the land surface, boundary layer, and clouds. I have done observational analysis using both in situ and remote-sensing data from field campaigns and long-term observations at ARM facilities. I have performed modeling and analysis using various tools and scales and supported constrained variational analysis for ASR cloud modeling.

Professional Experience

I have worked at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) since 2006, first as a postdoc and then a staff scientist. I have been active in the ARM/ASR community as a core member of the LLNL ASR science focus area team; I was also a key developer of the LLNL ARM infrastructure team. I currently co-chair the ASR warm boundary process working group and have co-led the ASR interest group of land-atmosphere interactions since 2014.

Youtong Zheng

Role

  • Assistant Professor, University of Houston

Education

  • PhD, University of Maryland, 2018
  • BS, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, 2012

Research Interests

I study low clouds. I am interested in many aspects of low cloud physics, including (1) the vertical air motions that form and maintain the clouds; (2) their coupling with underlying surfaces; (3) their interactions with aerosols; and (4) how they respond and feed back to the large-scale meteorology. I use whatever tools are appropriate to solve the problem: observations (satellite and experiments), theory (mostly simple ones that capture the “coarse-grain” behaviour), and large-eddy simulations.

Professional Experience

I started my academic career with developing satellite remote-sensing methods of inferring cloud updrafts and cloud condensation nuclei. To validate satellite retrievals, I used ARM experiment data heavily, which brought me into the ARM community. Near the end of my PhD, my original ideas on boundary-layer decoupling contributed greatly to a research proposal funded by ARM. While co-leading that project as a postdoc, I used ARM data from several campaigns, including MARCUS and MAGIC. I am a guest editor for Atmosphere and a session chair in the AMS 13th Symposium on Aerosol-Cloud-Climate Interactions.